5 Writing Resolutions for the New Year

If 2017 is the year you plan to publish a book, resolve to take solid steps to get you there. Here are five suggestions to set yourself up for success. Ready? Go!

1. Measure yourself

Set up a concrete goal in order to hold yourself accountable to writing. Perhaps it’s a word count, perhaps it’s a defined block of time. But whatever you choose, quantify it. That way, a month from now you’ll be able to say, “wow, I wrote x thousands of words” in January, or “hey, I spent y number of hours doing nothing but writing”!

2. Define your writing strengths and weaknesses, then put them to work

Have an honest talk with yourself about what you’re good at and what needs improvement. Make a list. Then, see if you can put your strengths to work helping other writers. For example, if you’re skilled at editing, offer to edit someone else’s work. Maybe you’re skilled at character development. Join a writer’s group to see if someone there could use your input. Conversely, look at your weaknesses and evaluate how you can improve. Could your grammar use a brush-up? Take some courses or add some grammar books to your reading list.

3. Remember, all great writers are great readers

No one writes brilliantly in a vacuum. Constantly take in other authors’ works. And don’t just stick to your genre or subject matter. Branch out. If you’re writing non-fiction, reading novels is a fantastic way to absorb how to set a scene or make a character come to life. If you’re working on a novel, make a point to read magazine profiles or biographies and learn what observed traits, behaviors, or dialogue might benefit your fictional characters. Poetry is also a wonderful way to explore language and learn to write richly and concisely. Keeping a journal of well-written passages or new words that you learn will be a constant inspiration for your own work.

4. Set up a support network

Having a writing buddy or joining an author’s workshopping group not only creates a cheering section and an opportunity to network, but also pushes everyone to hold each other accountable to their goals. Meeting regularly will create weekly or monthly deadlines to create new drafts and make sure your work keeps moving forward. It may take time to build trust and create a rhythm in the group, so don’t worry if your first few meetings are bumpy. It’s all part of the process.

Your social media network is also useful to sticking to your resolutions. Announce your goals as you create them, and keep your friends apprised of your progress. It’s even okay to admit your shortfalls. Your fans will admire your honesty and inspire you to push ahead.

5. Keep a running list of clichés and no-nos

As you write, notice if you fall back on words or phrases that aren’t serving your work. Just in the process of writing this article, I’ve flagged words like great, very, and amazing. These words aren’t descriptive; they’re useless fluff. As you edit, use the find and replace function in your word processor to flag them. Also make note of any bad habits like overuse of the passive voice, run-on sentences, parenthetical asides, or my personal pet peeve: exclamation points. Avoid these habits l̶i̶k̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶l̶a̶g̶u̶e̶.

Last year, we ran a featured poll about success and failure of new year’s resolutions. See what 100 PickFu respondents said!


Also published on Medium.